Making micro-business online make money

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"Speak, speak!" said the commissary. "Fear nothing.""Well," he went on, "M. Saint Pavin and M. Jottras were saying thatM. Favoral was only a poor dupe, but that they would know how tofind the others.""What others?""Ah! they didn't say."The commissary shrugged his shoulders.

"What!" he exclaimed, "you find yourself in presence of two menfurious to have been duped, who swear and threaten, and you can'tget from them a name that you want? You are not very smart,my dear!"And as the poor secretary, somewhat put out of countenance, lookeddown, and said nothing,"Did you at least ask them," he resumed, "who the woman is to whomthe article refers, and whose existence they have revealed to thereporter?""Of course I did, sir.""And what did they answer?""That they were not spies, and had nothing to say, M. Saint Pavinadded, however, that he had said it without much thought, and onlybecause he had once seen M. Favoral buying a three thousand francsbracelet, and also because it seemed impossible to him that a manshould do away with millions without the aid of a woman."The commissary could not conceal his ill humor.

"Of course!" he grumbled. "Since Solomon said, 'Look for the woman'

(for it was King Solomon who first said it), every fool thinks itsmart to repeat with a cunning look that most obvious of truths.

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What next?""M. Saint Pavin politely invited me to go to - well, not here."The commissary wrote rapidly a few lines, put them in an envelope,which he sealed with his private seal, and handed it to hissecretary, saying,"That will do. Take this to the prefecture yourself." And, afterthe secretary had gone out,"Well, M. Maxence," he said, "you have heard?" Of course he had.

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Only Maxence was thinking much less of what he had just heard thanof the strange interest this commissary had taken in his affairs,even before he had seen him.

"I think," he stammered, "that it is very unfortunate the womancannot be found."With a gesture full of confidence,"Be easy," said the commissary: "she shall be found. A woman cannotswallow millions at that rate, without attracting attention.

Believe me, we shall find her, unless -"He paused for a moment, and, speaking slowly and emphatically,"Unless," he added, "she should have behind her a very skillful andvery prudent man. Or else that she should be in a situation whereher extravagance could not have created any scandal."Mlle. Lucienne started. She fancied she understood the commissary'sidea, and could catch a glimpse of the truth.

"Good heavens!" she murmured.

But Maxence didn't notice any thing, his mind being wholly bent uponfollowing the commissary's deductions.

"Or unless," he said, "my father should have received almost nothingfor his share of the enormous sums subtracted from the Mutual Credit,in which case he could have given relatively but little to that woman.

M.Saint Pavin himself acknowledges that my father has beenegregiously taken in.""By whom?""Maxence hesitated for a moment.

"I think," he said at last, "and several friends of my family (amongwhom M. Chapelain, an old lawyer) think as I do, that it is verystrange that my father should have drawn millions from the MutualCredit without any knowledge of the fact on the part of the manager.""Then, according to you, M. de Thaller must be an accomplice."Maxence made no answer.

"Be it so," insisted the commissary. " I admit M. de Thaller'scomplicity; but then we must suppose that he had over your fathersome powerful means of action."An employer always has a great deal of influence over hissubordinates.""An influence sufficiently powerful to make them run the risk ofthe galleys for his benefit! That is not likely. We must try andimagine something else.""I am trying; but I don't find any thing.""And yet it is not all. How do you explain your father's silencewhen M. de Thaller was heaping upon him the most outrageous insults?""My father was stunned, as it were.""And at the moment of escaping, if he did have any accomplices, howis it that he did not mention their names to you, to your mother,or to your sister?""Because, doubtless, he had no proofs of their complicity to offer.""Would you have asked him for any?""0 sir!""Therefore such is not evidently the motive of his silence; and itmight better be attributed to some secret hope that he still hadleft."The commissary now had all the information, which, voluntarily orotherwise, Maxence was able to give him. He rose, and in thekindest tone,"You have come," he said to him, "to ask me for advice. Here it is:

say nothing, and wait. Allow justice and the police to pursue theirwork. Whatever may be your suspicions, hide them. I shall do foryou as I would for Lucienne, whom I love as if she were my ownchild; for it so happens, that, in helping you, I shall help her."He could not help laughing at the astonishment, which at those wordsdepicted itself upon Maxence's face; and gayly,"You don't understand," he added. "Well, never mind. It is notnecessary that you should."

Two o'clock struck as Mlle. Lucienne and Maxence left the officeof the commissary of police, she pensive and agitated, he gloomy andirritated. They reached the Hotel des Folies without exchanging aword. Mme. Fortin was again at the door, speechifying in the midstof a group with indefatigable volubility. Indeed, it was a perfectgodsend for her, the fact of lodging the son of that cashier whohad stolen twelve millions, and had thus suddenly become a celebrity.

Seeing Maxence and Mlle. Lucienne coming, she stepped toward them,and, with her most obsequious smile,"Back already?" she said.