How to make money on the middle school students

How to make money on the middle school students

Lucienne applied herself to some work of embroidery.

The girl was the cashier of the association; and she administeredthe common capital with such skillful and such scrupulous economy,that Maxence soon succeeded in paying off his creditors.

"Do you know," she was saying at the end of December, "that, betweenus, we have earned over six hundred francs this month?"On Sundays only, after a week of which not a minute had been lost,they indulged in some little recreation.

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If the weather was not too bad, they went out together, dined insome modest restaurant, and finished the day at the theatre.

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Having thus a common existence, both young, free, and having theirrooms divided only by a narrow passage it was difficult that peopleshould believe in the innocence of their intercourse. Theproprietors of the Hotel des Folies believed nothing of the kind;and they were not alone in that opinion.

Mlle. Lucienne having continued to show herself in the Bois on theafternoons when the weather was fine, the number of fools who annoyedher with their attentions had greatly increased. Among the mostobstinate could be numbered M. Costeclar, who was pleased todeclare, upon his word of honor, that he had lost his sleep, andhis taste for business, since the day when, together with M. SaintPavin, he had first seen Mlle. Lucienne.

The efforts of his valet, and the letters which he had written,having proved useless, M. Costeclar had made up his mind to act inperson; and gallantly he had come to put himself on guard in frontof the Hotel des Folies.

Great was his surprise, when he saw Mlle. Lucienne coming out armin arm with Maxence; and greater still was his spite.

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"That girl is a fool," he thought, "to prefer to me a fellow whohas not two hundred francs a month to spend. But never mind! Helaughs best who laughs last."And, as he was a man fertile in expedients, he went the next dayto take a walk in the neighborhood of the Mutual Credit; and, havingmet M. Favoral by chance, he told him how his son Maxence was ruininghimself for a young lady whose toilets were a scandal, insinuatingdelicately that it was his duty, as the head of the family, to put astop to such a thing.

This was precisely the time when Maxence was endeavoring to obtaina situation in the office of the Mutual Credit.

It is true that the idea was not original with him, and that he hadeven vehemently rejected it, when, for the first time, Mlle.

Lucienne had suggested it.

"What!" had he exclaimed, "be employed in the same establishment asmy father? Suffer at the office the same intolerable despotism asat home? I'd rather break stones on the roads."But Mlle. Lucienne was not the girl to give up so easily a projectconceived and carefully matured by herself.

She returned to the charge with that infinite art of women, whounderstand so marvelously well how to turn a position which theycannot carry in front. She kept the matter so well before him, shespoke of it so often and so much, on every occasion, and under allpretexts, that he ended by persuading himself that it was the onlyreasonable and practical thing he could do, the only way in whichhe had any chance of making his fortune; and so, one eveningovercoming his last hesitations,"I am going to speak about it to my father," he said to Mlle.

But whether he had been influenced by M. Costeclar's insinuations,or for some other reason, M. Favoral had rejected indignantly hisson's request, saying that it was impossible to trust a young manwho was ruining himself for the sake of a miserable creature.

Maxence had become crimson with rage on hearing the woman spoken ofthus, whom he loved to madness, and who, far from ruining him, wasmaking him.

He returned to the Hotel des Folies in an indescribable state ofexasperation.

"There's the result," he said to Mlle. Lucienne, "of the step whichyou have urged me so strongly to take."She seemed neither surprised nor irritated.